State of the Rio Olympics

Samuel Ramsey-Lucas

Rio was chosen in 2009 to host the 2016 Summer Olympics because it was a very stable country but seven years later president Dilma Rousseff is facing impeachment.

Several of high-ranking politicians are involved in a major corruption scandal with the oil company run by the state. The country is also unstable because of the threat of the Zika virus.

There are concerns about border control because Brazil has borders with ten other countries that experts think terrorists might exploit.

“The Islamic State and Al Qaeda are always looking for those major venues where they can make a very powerful statement,” Alberto Fernandez, a counterterrorism expert, told CBS news.

There is also the threat of the Zika virus. The World Health Organization has declared the Zika virus to be a global health emergency.

The Zika virus causes serious birth defects such as microcephaly which is an abnormal smallness of the head, a congenital condition associated with incomplete brain development.

U.S. soccer star Hope Solo admitted she is concerned about the Zika virus but will still compete in the games.

“At some point, I do want to start a family and I don’t want to be worried, I don’t want to have those anxieties,” Hope Solo said to CBS news.

Alligators have been breeding near the site of the Olympic golf course. Rio’s main Olympic waterways are contaminated. Experts say that athletes will be competing in the equivalent of raw sewage. After sailing in Rio’s waters Erik Heil believes that he got flesh eating bacteria.

Despite all of this Rio is on track to host the Olympics. The games cost 11 billion dollars. 60 percent of this money came from private donations.

“We feel that the Rio 2016 team is ready to rise to these challenges and to deliver Olympic and Paralympic Games that will reflect the Brazilian warmth, the Brazilian hospitality and love for the games,” The chairwoman of the IOC Coordination Commission told CBS news.

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